Course catalogue

BA 202: Business and Society
Instructor: Dr. Jason Phillips
Semester: Fall 2012

An analysis of the social, political, legal, environmental, historical, and ethical problems faced by business firms.

BA 300: Survey of Marketing
Instructor: Dr. Jason Phillips
Semester: Fall 2012

Examines the impact of marketing systems in producing a standard of living in local and global economies. Topics include the structure and functions of marketing within an organization, the role of customers, and the competitive, political/legal/regulatory, economic, social-cultural, and technological environments in which these systems operate.

BA 301: Principles of Management
Instructor: Dr. Jason Phillips
Semester: Fall 2012

Introduction to the principles and functions of management. Examines the management process, organizational theory, planning, decision making, motivation, and leadership in various contexts.

BUS 223 Business Study Tour
Instructor: Dr. Jason Phillips
Semester: Spring 2015

A specially designed study tour to an international location or locations which offers students a unique opportunity to study business and develop a better understanding of the business environment – its dimensions, participants, trends, and opportunities.  Students will also experience the heritage, ambiance, and excitement of the regions visited.  Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

COMM 110: Public Speaking
Instructor: Leslie J. Helgeson
Semester: Spring 2012

Instructor: Dr. Stephen Rendahl
Semester: Spring 2014

The theory and practice of public speaking with emphasis on content, organization, language, delivery, and critical evaluation messages. Basic principles of speech from the viewpoint of composition and delivery. Emphasis on student performance stressing original thinking, effective organization and direct communication of ideas in English. You will improve your communication skills by presenting information  expressing ideas and constructing arguments for particular purposes and audiences. You will also use critical thinking skills of analysis, syntheses and evaluation to create effective oral presentations where you will present research, cite sources and format outlines.

COMM 201: Visual Communication
Instructor: Dr. Adonica Schultz Aune
Semester: Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Fall 2014

Will facilitate discussion and the understanding of fundamental concepts regarding how human beings incorporate visual images into their everyday lives. In this course, you will explore aspects of today’s media and its theory in practice, explaining how to achieve a strong communication chain – from strategy and messages to design target and influence – to reach the audience. This course will be invaluable for anyone wanting to communicate through the use of images and text whether in the fields of graphic design, advertising, editorial design, journalism, new media, information technology, mass communication, photography, film or television – in fact, any discipline that seeks to deliver a message through words and pictures.

COMM 206 Digital Communication
Instructor: Dr. Adonica Schultz Aune
Semester: Fall 2015, Fall 2016

An introduction to the theory and practice of digital communication for print, online and mobile media. Course emphasis is on a holistic approach to digital design including both theoretical knowledge and software expertise. Course involves creating a series of portfolio-ready digital artifacts.

COMM 212: Interpersonal Communication
Instructor: Dr. Adonica Schultz Aune
Semester: Spring 2013, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017

The goal of this course is to discuss and model fundamental concepts of communication between individuals. In this course you will explore aspects of self-expression and relationship communication, become familiar with fundamental concepts relative to communication between individuals, gain insight into the dynamics of interpersonal communication, and develop an understanding of how people present themselves to others and how others perceive them in return.

COM 224: Communication Research 
Instructor: Dr. Elizabeth Munz

An examination of the nature of inquiry and research in communication. Emphasis on understanding and appreciating the strengths and weaknesses of various methods of research in communication. photography, film or television – in fact, any discipline that seeks to deliver a message through words and pictures.

COMM 402 International Communication
Instructor: Dr. Stephen Rendahl
Semester: Spring 2014

This course will provide an overview of the study of intercultural or international communication. Topics addressed will include: history, literature, and culture of specific groups including racial, religious, and ethnic issues that affect communication patterns and outcomes.  [We will relate the content to the Nobel Peace Laureates.]

CRJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice
Instructor: Sami Abdel-Salam, WCU
Semester: Fall 2015

This course is designed to describe the criminal justice system from arrest through trial, appeal, sentencing, correction, and parole. The object of this course is to provide the student with a procedural framework of the criminal justice process.

CRJ 220 Criminology
Instructor: Sami Abdel-Salam, WCU
Semester: Fall 2015

This course is a survey of the historical and contemporary attempts to explain the phenomena of crime and criminal behavior from the perspectives of sociology, psychology, economics, biology, and law. Emphasis will be placed on contemporary theory and the analysis of evidence supportive of various theoretical positions.

CRJ 445 Drugs, Crime and Criminal Justice
Instructor: Sami Abdel-Salam, WCU
Semester: Fall 2015

This course examines the role that drugs play in the criminal justice system. Topics covered include the history of drug prohibition; the types of illegal drugs currently available; patterns, trends, and scope of illicit drug use; consideration of the relationship between drugs and crime; and manifestations and consequences of the criminal justice system response.

ENGL 110: College Composition I
Instructor: Beth Schoborg
Semester: Fall 2012

Instructor: Kirby Lund
Semester: Fall 2013

Instructor: Deanne Sparks
Semester: Fall 2014

Instructor: Kim Stewart
Semester: Fall 2015

Instructor: Sam Johnson
Semester: Fall 2016

Immersion in college-level critical reading, and expository writing, emphasizing revision and careful preparation of manuscripts.

ENGL 120: College Composition II – Research and Argumentation
Instructor: Brian Maxwell
Semester: Spring 2012

Instructor: Errin Jordan
Semester: Spring 2013

Instructor: Mosab Bajaber
Semester: Spring 2014

English 120 (College Composition II) serves as the follow up to English 110 (College Comp I), completing the two-course sequence of basic composition courses necessary for students to engage in the type of extensive interdisciplinary study that will accompany their majors. English 110 introduced students to a number of important reading and writing strategies, including: focus, controlling ideas, claims and evidence, working with sources, and providing rhetorical cues to readers. English 120 continues this emphasis, while additionally requiring students to develop and produce their own  extended research projects—projects in which you will gather your own sources and develop your own arguments through extensive research and reading. English 120 emphasizes academic reading and writing—in all guises—and students are invited to become active researchers, developing ways of understanding unfamiliar subjects by  building on personal interest and knowledge.

ENGL 130: College Composition II: Writing for Public Audience
Instructor: Benjamin Morris
Semester: Spring 2015

Instructor: Bridget Tetteh-Batsa
Semester: Spring 2016

Instructor: Brittney Christy
Semester: Spring 2017

English 130, College Composition II: Writing for Public Audiences, builds on the academic writing skills practiced in English 110, but, in the interest of developing engaged citizens of the information age, the course will ask students to produce research projects, collaborative group proposals, and written documents with a practical purpose (documents that will help inform and persuade the public, such as letters, emails, websites, promotional materials, etc.). You will begin the course by reading about an important social issue and then will determine how you might use this knowledge to serve your communities. A community project will then lead you to both primary and secondary research projects and to a collaborative proposal. At the end of the semester, you will practice writing to effectively promote the community issue and project. Throughout the semester, the course will ask you to think carefully about audience and purpose as you consider the real impact that your writing could have on actual audiences.

ENGL 225: Introduction to Film: Alternative Realities through Film
Instructor: Beth Schoborg
Semester: Fall 2012

This class will focus especially on those films that don’t abide by common sense or the laws of reality. Or, to put a finer point on it, this class will ask what it means for a film to create its own reality. We’ll compare alternate histories, alternate futures, science fiction, and fantasy. We’ll examine the techniques filmmakers use to explore the possibilities of each film’s alternate reality. This class will give students the opportunity to learn the vocabulary used to interpret films. We’ll work especially on close readings of scenes and will practice this skill in class discussions and written work.

ENGL 225 Introduction to Film
Instructor: Mosab Bajaber
Semester: Spring 2014

Science Fiction and utopian subjects.

ENGL 226: Introduction to Creative Writing
Instructor: Brian Maxwell
Semester: Spring 2012

Instructor: Brittney Christy
Semester: Spring 2017

This is the first in a series of three undergraduate classes. As such, it will not focus on any one genre of writing; instead the course will serve as an introduction to techniques, texts, philosophies and the craft of writing in general. Though we will utilize a workshop format when appropriate, we will also have assigned readings and responses designed to expose you to other aspects of the life of a creative writer. Workshops will not be used only to respond to the work of the other students, but as opportunities to learn how to discuss and evaluate works in general. We will also make a valid effort to learn some of the vocabulary of both literature and creative writing, so that when we engage in conversations about each we can utilize the precise language and technical know-how of the fields in question.

ENGL 227: Introduction to Literature & Culture: From Story to Film to Life! 
Instructor: Sam Johnson

The notion that “literature is a mirror of life” is a widely accepted premise from which to begin a discussion about a work of literature. Through their stories, authors convey certain messages for the purpose of education, information and entertainment. Writers transpose the events of their life, of their society, into stories that transport us (the reader) into their “reality” for us to reflect upon. Similarly, when filmmakers interpret the “reality” found in a work of literature, the final vision of the film reflects not only the ideas of the original author, but also the vision of the filmmakers. In this course, we will read several works of literature, then view the movie versions of these works, examining how they take us “From Story to Film to Life!”This class will be largely discussion-based with an emphasis on in-class participation. Students will be expected to read several short works of literature, view and discuss the films, then write a short “reflection” after each film.

ENGL 227: Introduction to Literature and Culture
Intructor: Brian Maxwell
Semester: Spring 2012

Is violence really the American way? Ira Leonard seems to thinks so, arguing that “[t]he reality untaught in American schools and textbooks is that war—whether on a large or small scale—and domestic violence have been pervasive in American life and culture from the country’s earliest days almost 400 years ago.” According to historian Richard Maxwell Brown: “Violence, in varying forms, has accompanied virtually every stage and aspect of [the] national experience,” and is “part of [the] unacknowledged value structure” of the United States. Brown also suggests that “repeated episodes of violence going far back into [the] colonial past, have imprinted  upon our citizens a propensity to violence.” On the other hand, scholar David Brion Davis argues that “[t]he frequency of fighting and killing in American literature is not necessarily proof of an unusually violent society, but literary treatments of violence have reflected certain historical conditions and circumstances. The growth of popular literacy created a mass audience whose attention could best be held by suspense, surprise, and startling contrast.” That literature dependent upon elements of “suspense, surprise, and startling contrast” might also rely on acts or near acts of violence, should probably come as no surprise; but what else can a close study of American short fiction tell us about American cultural paradigms and literary engagement? As a Literature and Culture course, “Violence and the Short Story” will serve as both an introduction to contemporary American fiction and an investigation into the way violence functions and signals in the American short story. We’ll read stories, navigate stereotypes, archetypes, and clichés; we’ll take a close look at cultural stigmas and examples of regional bias; and of course, we’ll bear witness to some things gruesome and graceful as we read our way through a truly American landscape.

ENGL 227: Introduction to Literature and Culture: Political Satire and Humor in U.S. Fiction
Instructor: Errin Jordan
Semester: Spring 2013

Arguably, the most memorable events of the 2012 presidential election were not the interesting debates or the charismatic slogans. What many will remember from this heated election is the influence of satiric television shows, such as The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and The Colbert Report, had on the opinions and mindsets of the American people. This influence of political parody and satire, this impact that political humor has on U.S. culture, will be the focus of this course. We will focus this course on an exploration of the current state of political satire and its influence on United States society and political sensibility. By looking at Stewart’s and Colbert’s programs, as well as episodes of South Park and Saturday Night Live, we will begin to develop an understanding of how political satire, while entertaining, shapes the way in which an American viewing audience understands the world of politics. We will also look at Joseph Heller’s Catch 22 in order to discuss how American satirists have reimagined important concepts, such as war and history, in order to examine the political climate of the US in a unique and entertaining way.

ENGL 227: Introduction to Literature: Arthurian Legends
Instructor: Kirby Lund
Semester: Fall 2013

Focus on Arthurian Legends and incorporating a lot of films.

ENGL 227: Intro to Literature and Culture
Instructor: Benjamin Morris
Semester: Spring 2015

This course focuses on the theory of adaptation of the contemporary American short story to film. We’ll work closely with Stephanie Harrison’s “Adaptations: From Short Story to Big Screen” to gain an understanding of the body of theory behind adaptations and the fundamentals of fidelity to an original work of literature. A main objective of the course is to improve the students’ ability to analyze the two types of media and to determine the capabilities and limits of such literary transpositions. The class will ultimately help the students determine in a scholarly way what makes an adaptation successful. Students will be required to read the short story and the accompanying theory behind the adaptation prior to and again after viewing the film. The class will be discussion-based with an emphasis on in-class participation.

ENGL 227 Introduction to Literature and Culture
Instructor: Kim Stewart, UND
Semester: Fall 2015

In the essay “Why We Crave Horror Movies”, Steven King claims that movie goers are drawn to chilling characters, images, and stories because these depictions allow us to feed the monster within all of us in a contained and socially acceptable way. Without these experiences, he argues, we would be unable to keep our monsters safely hidden behind the secret door in our minds. Why shouldn’t we trust this assertion by King, a man whose own literary progeny includes Carrie and Pennywise, the nightmarish clown from It? On the other hand, monsters in literature are often representations of groups misunderstood and marginalized by the cultural majority. In this way, monsters can be read and interpreted as representations of the “other” in literature and film.

In an attempt to explore these two perspectives, this course will examine the role of monsters in literature across genres as representations of the monsters within and without. We will begin with a close reading of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, a thorough examination of the text through a variety of critical lenses, and analysis of several film adaptations and re-imaginings of this classic novel. These steps will establish the framework through which we will read, analyze, and discuss other monsters in novels, short stories, poetry, and film.

ENGL 229 Diversity in US Literature (Special Topic: Im/migration in US Literatures)
Instructor: Deanne Sparks
Semester: Fall 2014

This course will investigate how texts portray the journeys, hopes, and hardships of dislocation, alienation, and assimilation as well as the role literature might play in creating a sense of community for im/migrants, refugees, exiles, and temporary residents within the United States and its border regions. Drawing on a few theoretical texts about migration literature, ethnicity, and memory, this course will discuss a subset of the following themes: diaspora and home(land); borders and border-crossings; exile and otherness; language and silence; gender and sexuality; trauma and memory; intercultural and generational conflict and reconciliation; race and ethnicity.

ENGL 229 Diversity in US Literature (Special Topic: Notions of Feminine Beauty in American Literature and Culture)

In this course, students will be introduced to conversations on the complex connections between notions of feminine beauty, race, class, and gender. Students will be introduced to the general concept/theory of “anti-racist aestheticism” in race studies: the concept will help us understand and analyze “hierarchies of feminine beauty” in American literature and culture and its psychological, cultural, social, and even economic consequences. We will also consider the “trope of the male-gaze,” and symbolic acts of resistance or agency. We will, in other words, analyze texts that place our perceptions of feminine beauty into historical and cultural perspective, and ask questions about how the texts reinforce or challenge notions of feminine beauty in American culture.

ENGL 230 Survey of Medieval British Literature from Beowulf to Chaucer
Instructor: Dr. Jane Jeffrey
Semester: Spring 2014

This course is a survey of English literature and literary history from the tenth through the fifteenth centuries. In addition to introducing students to the literature’s historical and linguistic context, this course will help students develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. History of the English Language. This course will introduce students to the development of the English language from Old English to contemporary world English. Students will learn how specific sounds, sentence structures, and meanings have changed over time, why there are so many varieties of English today, and how to study language in its social context with a special emphasis on race, class, gender, and ethnicity.

GEOG 121 Global Physical Environment
Instructor: Dr. Paul Todhunter
Semester: Spring 2015

A study of the pattern of distribution of the physical elements of the global environment. The origin and characteristics of the terrestrial grid, earth-space relations, climate, landforms, vegetation, and soils.

GEOG 121 Global Physical Environment Laboratory
Instructor: Dr. Paul Todhunter
Semester: Spring 2015

A basic environmental science laboratory to complement GEOG 121.

GEOG 262 Geography of North America
Instructor: Dr. Paul Todhunter
Semester: Spring 2015

A spatial approach to the development of Canada and the United State which emphasizes the transformation of the cultural landscape by exploring the contributions of the diverse peoples who inhabit the two nation-states and deal with a global economy.

GEOL 101: Introduction to Geology
Instructor: Dr. Dexter Perkins
Semester: Spring 2016

Introduction to the dynamics of the Earth — volcanoes, earthquakes, plate tectonics, streams, groundwater, glaciers, waves, wind, and landslides, with emphasis on the environmental applications of these processes. Introduction to the tools of the geologist — minerals, rocks, maps, and aerial photographs.

GEOL 103: Environmental Issues
Instructor: Dr. Dexter Perkins
Semester: Spring 2016

Introduction to Environmental Issues. A survey of environmental issues concerning society’s interaction with Earth’s natural systems and exploitation of Earth’s resources.

HIST 330: The United States: Social & Cultural, 19th Century
Instructor: Abbey Schneider
Semester: Spring 2013

The United States of America and Americans themselves are regarded the world over as one place and one people. Indeed, the motto on the Seal of the United States of America indicates as much: e pluribus unum (out of many, one). But Americans are equally divided on every major issue they face today. How does this reconcile with the pledge recited by school children across the United States: “one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all”? Questions of unity and diversity are arguably the most salient questions in American History as well as contemporary American culture. What unifies the people of the United States into a singular macro-culture of “American”? From the many micro-cultures that delineate the United States as among the most diverse countries in the world is e pluribus unum possible?

In this course we will examine the development of a national culture by investigating the contributions of social institutions and micro-cultures on attitudes toward social reform, intellectualism and social status. Emphasis on competing regional identities and trends, and the special tension in the United States between unity and diversity will frame our investigation. Additionally and in light of the extraordinary United States Presidential election in 2008, we will continuously move between 19 th century origins and contemporary manifestations of American culture.

HIST 343: Ancient Greece
Instructor: Dr. Tito Correa
Semester: Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

A study of Greek prehistory and history to the end of the Hellenistic era. Greek achievements in art, commerce, literature, politics, religion, science, and technology are surveyed.

HIST 344 Ancient Rome
Instructor: Dr. Tito Correa
Semester: Spring 2014, Spring 2015, Spring 2016, Spring 2017

A survey of the prehistory, historical development, and ultimate decline in Rome. In addition to inquiries into the military, political, cultural, economic, and religious experiences of the ancient Romans, this course will attempt to delineate those qualities of life that were peculiarly Roman.

HON 292: History of India/Pakistan/Afghanistan
Instructor: Dr. Burt Thorp
Semester: Fall 2013

In this survey of India, Pakistan, and Afghanistan, from the ancient period to contemporary events, from before Buddha to the war with the Taliban, we will study historical connections between the three states, the migrations of people, languages, and religions, the rise and fall of empires, the advent of colonialism, the triumph of independence, and later invasions and wars. The three nation-states are closely intertwined in history and are now part of western history as well.

HON 293: Colloquium in the Sciences: Global Environmental Issues
Instructor: Dr. Tami Carmichael
Semester: Summer 2014

Global climate change, deforestation, land and water rights…all of these issues impact countries around the world and have spurred scientific debate, political rhetoric, and governmental policy changes. In this discussion based, interactive course, we will study major world environmental crises and what is being done to address them. We will also discuss the intersection of environmental policies with human rights issues. The course will focus particularly on U.S. and Norwegian approaches to engaging in the global dialogue of environmental crises.

HON 291: Colloquium in the Humanities – The Human Brain
Instructor: Dr. Lars Helgeson
Semester: Spring 2012

This course is designed to introduce the history and current knowledge about the brain. We will read and discuss issues and information that provide the basis for how we live, how we relate to one another, our evolution, and how we operate as human beings in a complex world. While we base our study on current scientific research there are areas of knowledge that remain a mystery to scientists. We cross over into realms of philosophy and experience that challenge our beliefs and understanding. Each of the texts has a purpose that helps us to see different brain and nervous system operations. No one has all the answers, but this course should prepare you to critically read brain related articles and books. Some writers are strictly materialistic scientists, while other writers push the limits of our ideas about human potential. The course is meant to challenge your thinking and provoke thought and argument (in the good and logical sense, i.e., no screaming and yelling at one another). We will study intellect, emotions, diet, exercise, memory, stress and stress reduction, and other topics.

HON 293: Colloquium in the Sciences: Health & Human Rights
Instructor: Brian Schill
Semester: Summer 2013

For decades, academic, medical, and political officials across the globe have known that health and life expectancy are connected not only to the availability of quality health services, but to several “nonmedical” factors, including nations’ degree of economic inequality, their political culture, and their specific value system(s). Beyond providing clean drinking water and vaccinations against infectious disease, though, what role should governing bodies play in maintaining the health of a population in a nonmedical sense? What role do discrimination, political freedoms (or their absence), and labour policy play in a nation’s health? How useful is the 25th Article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states that “Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family…”? This course will explore each of these questions specifically and the relationship between human rights and health generally for the ACN Summer session in 2013. There is perhaps no better place for students of all national and ethnic backgrounds to explore these questions than Norway, which consistently holds the lead position in several U.N. and World Health Organization measures for global health.

HON 382: Exploring Global Diversity: Social Science – Immigrant Integration
Instructor: Robin David
Semester: Summer 2013

Refugees and other immigrants are coming to our countries in significant numbers. In this course, we’ll examine both what brings them and how we best make them part of our communities. What kind of conditions make for most successful integration? And what does “successful integration” look like? What’s the difference between assimilation and integration? The United States and various European approaches will be considered. Together, we will explore immigration integration from a personal to a policy level. With immigrants currently making up approximately 10% of the United States and Europe, it is an important time to be contemplating these questions.

HON 382: Exploring Global Diversity: Social Science – Global Human Rights Issues
Instructor: Dr. Paul Sum
Semester: Summer 2014

Proponents of human rights maintain that in the absence of such rights we cannot realize our full potential as human beings in a physical, intellectual, or spiritual sense. In essence, human rights form the basis through which we realize human dignity. As stated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, human rights are “the foundation of freedom, justice and peace in the world.”

The interactive, discussion based course will be organized as an inquiry into some of the most important human rights issues facing the international community including: identifying and preventing genocide (Democratic Republic of Congo); protection of civilians in armed conflict (Syria); torture and other cruel treatments (United States); human trafficking (multiple countries); discrimination against women/minorities; environmental protection and human rights. Through an investigation of these problems, students will understand theories related to human rights, be able to identify and explain major human rights violations, and understand institutions and mechanisms set up to address human rights violations in the international arena.

HON 392: Politics of Human Rights
Instructor: Dr. Rebecca Leber-Gottberg
Semester: Summer 2012

We live in the age of human rights—but what exactly does this mean? What is
a “human right”? Where does this idea come from? What do we have rights to, and
who may we justly claim should recognize them? Does the expression “human rights”
indicate something distinct, or are all rights “human” in some sense? What do we make
of claims to universal human rights in a culturally diverse world? Human rights cannot
be separated from politics—we cannot understand why human rights abuses happen,
how external issues affect human rights, or why international actors respond to human
rights issues in the way that they do without examining the larger political contexts in
which the issues and policies take place. In this course we will address a variety of
topics ranging from human rights abuses to environmental issues that impact human
rights. This course will be made up of large and small group discussion and projects,
political/historical/current event readings, videos, speakers and possibly field trips.

HON 393: Global Environmental Issues
Instructor: Dr. Lars Helgeson
Semester: Summer 2012

This course uses the Science Program for Public Understanding modules titled Investigating Environmental Health Risks that provide students with background in designing experiments to solve a particular problem, acquiring scientifically obtained data and evidence, and the using the evidence to evaluate solutions to Environmental problems. This procedure of decision making with scientifically obtain evidence is commensurate with the procedures for action and decision making outlined in the discussion with Gro Harlem Bruntland on Monday, 9 Jan. 2012. This course, by means of apparently simplistic procedures promotes the ability to explore scientific concepts in real-world situations, to use evidence to reason about a particular problem or issue, and reach conclusions and make decisions justified by evidence. Environmental Health Risks are a Global Concern.

HON 393 Advanced Colloquium in the Sciences – Human Impact on the Environment
Instructor: Dr. Paul Todhunter
Semester: Spring 2015

This course is focused on an historical survey of the ways in which humans have impacted and changed the physical environment.

HUM 212: Integrated Cultural Experience – Digital Photography
Instructor: Dr. Lars Helgeson
Semester: Spring 2012

This course will provide participants with competency in the use of a basic digital camera and familiarity with all the various settings. The emphasis in this course is on application of the photographic skills in personal settings. The course includes the integration of photographic images and their interpretation for use on the internet, e.g., Facebook, and in printed document such as reports and letters.
This course is designed to simplify learning photographic technology, and to provide participants with skills for using digital images in their classroom and work. Participants be instructed in the use of various equipment including cameras, lenses, strobes, tripods, filters, scanners, printers and image storage devices. But the course is limited mostly to the “point and shoot” style of camera commonly in use by most people. There are three main sections or topics in the course:
1. Familiarity with the simple digital camera settings.
2. Photo composition principles
3. Using of free picture editing software to prepare pictures of your own purposes.

HUM 212: Integrated Cultural Experience – Drama and Poetry
Instructor: Kathryn Sweney
Semester: Spring 2013

A very interactive and creative class. Students will participate in reader’s theater activities, create basic poems in a variety of traditions, and view and discuss productions.

HUM 212: Integrated Cultural Experience –  History and Culture of Ireland
Instructor: Dr. Jason Phillips
Semester: Fall 2013, Fall 2014

Ireland has had a significant influence on 21st century America and popular culture.  The purpose of this common academic experience is to explore the culture, myths, religion, history, archeology, and art of Ireland.  Students will have reading, films,  and writing assignments designed to enhance their learning and travel experiences. Students will travel to Dublin.

HUM 212: Integrated Cultural Experience
Instructor: Emily Cherry, MFA
Semester: Spring 2017

Students will discuss proper theatre etiquette, explore the importance of live theatre and art and begin to critique live theatre.

HUM 224 Integrated Social Science Inquiry: Pilgrims and Puritans and the founding of America
Instructor: Dr. Tito Correa
Semester: Spring 2015, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

In this course we focus on Pilgrims and Puritans, the principal protagonists of Colonial America. We trace their beginnings in England, follow them as they settle in the Netherlands, and further on to their move to New England and the establishment of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. We will examine the ethos of Puritanism and discuss their influence in the creation of the United States of America. An optional compliment of this course will be a visit to Amsterdam and Leiden in the Netherlands where the Pilgrim Fathers settled before moving to the New World.

HUM 225: Advanced Integrated Social Science – Science and Society
Instructor: Dr. Lars Helgeson
Semester: Spring 2012

This course uses the Science Program for Public Understanding modules that provide students with background in designing experiments to solve a particular problem, acquiring scientifically obtained data and evidence, and the using the evidence to evaluate solutions to the problem. This procedure of decision making with scientifically obtain evidence is commensurate with the procedures for action and decision making outlined in the discussion with Gro Harlem Bruntland on Monday, 9 Jan. 2012. This course, by means of apparently simplistic procedures promotes the ability to explore scientific concepts in real-world situations, to use evidence to reason about a particular problem or issue, and reach conclusions and make decisions justified by evidence.

HUM 225: Advanced Integrated Social Science
HUM 270: Integrated Studies Life Science
Instructor: Kathryn Sweney
Semester: Spring 2013

In these linked courses, students will engage in study and discussion of several important ideas and questions as they relate to both the social sciences and sciences. The theme for the semester will be “From the Margins to the Center,” and we’ll be looking at clusters of issues in various fields. How, for instance, do we consider genetic testing? What do scientists say? What are our legal rights? How do different cultures think about the issue? The course is very interactive and will help students develop and practice their critical thinking skills.

HUM 271: Integrated General Science – Environmental Issues
Instructor: Dr. Dexter Perkins
Semester: Spring 2016

This course is divided into three Parts: Part I will provide the context in which Earth materials are studied, fundamental concepts that will be used subsequently including: how we study Earth materials, how Earth materials interact with other components of the Earth system, and a rationale for why Earth materials are important for the study of Earth (including processes and history) and the importance of Earth materials in our personal and societal lives. Part II will undertake a systematic look at Earth materials as they occur in different settings. We will identify and describe the key Earth materials, their properties, their distribution and occurrences, the processes that form them, and how scientists use these materials to interpret Earth. Part III will be an investigation of the practical applications of Earth materials to issues of societal importance (e.g., resources, hazards, engineering) and special applications that affect contemporary issues related to living on Earth.

HUM 391: Advanced Humanities Seminar: Global Leadership, 1 credit
Instructor: Becky Norvang
Semester: Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Fall 2016

This seminar course will look at the role of leaders in the global community. Future leaders face great challenges as they work to find solutions to complex problems in our increasingly interconnected world. Many of the world’s most pressing problems will require global reaction and cooperation, and global leadership will be key in confronting these issues and balancing cultural and political differences.

HUM 391 Advanced Seminar in the Humanities – Women and Children’s Rights, 2 credits
Instructor: Becky Norvang
Semester: Spring 2015

There is little question among peace scholars of the importance of securing the basic human rights of women and children in creating sustainable peace. “Women hold the key to peace.” says Malcolm Potts, Bixby Professor in the School of Public Health at UC-Berkeley in his 2013 address at the Nobel Peace Prize Forum in Minneapolis. Likewise, children also represent a vulnerable group in society. The Convention of the Rights of the Child (CRC) was created in 1989 to specifically address the rights of children.

This class will consider the rights of women and children through stories, film, and readings. Students will become familiar with organizations like the United Nations, and be introduced to international conventions that lay the groundwork for the monitoring of countries compliance or noncompliance. Students will also explore the stories of women and children around the world through literature and film.

HUM 391: Advanced Seminar in the Humanites – Social Entrepreneurship
Instructor: Becky Norvang
Semester: Spring 2016, Spring 2017

This course will be shaped around a conversation about social entrepreneurship and the role social entrepreneurs play in creating positive social change in our rapidly evolving global community. Governments and often large well-established NGOs are slow to adapt and are struggling to provide the necessary services that millions of marginalized and disadvantaged people desperately need. And this is where social entrepreneurs can pick up the slack. Throughout this course students will be identifying social issues that they feel passionate about and learn how these issues might be rectified using social entrepreneurship. All students will create a business plan for a fictitious social venture that in some way addresses a social issue.

IDS 399: Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies – Geo-Politics of the Arctic
Instructor: Dr. John Ross
Semester: Spring 2016, Fall 2016

Over the past decade, the Arctic region has seeped into the world’s collective consciousness. Melting polar ice, huge oil finds and Russian assertiveness have grabbed headlines. What do such developments mean, and how might they affect the rest of us? This interdisciplinary course aims to provide perspective on this mysterious yet vital region. As the name suggests, the subject lies at the crossroads of geography and politics. More broadly, its harsh yet fragile nature touches on a range of physical sciences (climatology, biology, geology), while its past and potential makes it interesting for the social sciences (history, economics, political science).

LIN 335 History of the English Language
Instructor: Dr. Jane Jeffrey
Semester: Spring 2014

This course will introduce students to the development of the English language from Old English to contemporary world English. Students will learn how specific sounds, sentence structures, and meanings have changed over time, why there are so many varieties of English today, and how to study language in its social context with a special emphasis on race, class, gender, and ethnicity. There will be a section emphasizing the Scandinavian, and particularly Norwegian, influence on the English language and a section of the influence of English on Norwegian culture.

LGS Global Issues II: Problem-Solving in a Global Context
Instructor: Peter DeBartolo
Semester: Spring 2012

This course is designed to help students further broaden and deepen their knowledge and understanding of contemporary global trends and international affairs. The course specifically examines international issues from a solutions-oriented perspective and promotes integrative, critical, and creative thinking about today’s complex and multidimensional global problems, conflicts, and crises. This course invites students to become engaged global citizens and encourages them to actively participate in developing solutions to many of the world’s most pressing challenges relating to international develepment, conflict resolution and diplomacy, climate change, transnational terrorism, global public health, nuclear proliferation, and much more.

MKT 325 Marketing Management
Instructor: Dr. Jason Phillips
Semester: Spring 2014

This course will focus on customer behavior, products, channels of distribution, promotion, and pricing with an emphasis on the similarities and differences that exist with regard to the American and Norwegian  business environments. American College of Norway students (Moss, Norway) who enroll in this course will be paired with students from West Chester University (West Chester, Pennsylvania, U.S.A.) to complete course assignments.  This will be a unique opportunity for ACN students to work directly with WCU students and vice versa.  It will be a truly be an international course.

The course will discuss terminology and important concepts related to marketing in the business environment.  U.S. and international environments that impact marketing are included, with particular emphasis on the marketing environment, segmentation, positioning, and targeting. Course objectives include providing an overview and introduction to marketing; demonstrating the relationship of marketing to other functions and processes in a business organization on an integrated basis; providing real world examples of challenges and issues related to marketing; and explaining and discussing important concepts and analytical tools in marketing.

Major themes embedded in the course include domestic and global economic factors influencing current marketing environments; how consumer, business and organizational customers are segmented and targeted; how marketing research and information systems are used to create and guide marketing strategies; how products are developed to serve customers, businesses and organizations; how customers are reached through various conventional and technological channels and how these sales management processes are managed; how marketing communications programs, including advertising, publicity, sales promotion and web sites, are designed to reach U.S. and international customers; and how pricing strategies support corporate objectives in various economic climates.

PHIL 300: Ancient Philosophy
Instructor: Dr. Burt Thorp
Semester: Fall 2013

The ancient Greeks and Romans laid the foun-dations for even the most contemporary philosophy, and their ideas have had a continuing influence on all Western thought from their time to our own. This course attempts to examine those ideas and the reasons for their persistent relevance.

POLS 220: International Politics
Instructor: Tito Correa
Semester: Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

This is an introductory survey course in international relations designed to help students relate, organize, and analyze the wide array of political events that occur on the international level. The general orientation of the course is theoretical. Consequently, this class focuses on discovering patterns in the behavior of states as they interact with each other, and understanding the various factors that might explain this behavior. Considerable attention is given in class to demonstrating how theoretical analysis helps us to understand and explain current international developments. Finally, this course introduces students to political science as a field of study.

POLS 220: International Politics
Instructor: Dr. John Ross
Semester: Fall 2014, Fall 2015, Spring 2017

This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to key concepts, developments and trends in the international political system. Drawing on historical precedents and contemporary examples, it aims to help students understand the structure and functioning of today’s complex world. The building blocks (states, nations, international organizations, transnational actors), the nature of their interactions, and notions like international society and globalization will be explored. It also introduces key theoretical approaches to the field of study, such as realism, idealism and functionalism, and discusses the strengths and shortcomings of each approach in helping us understand 21st century problems and issues.

POLS 225: Comparative Politics
Instructor: Dr. John Ross
Semester: Spring 2016, Fall 2016

An introduction to comparative politics with emphasis on the democratic systems of Europe.

RELS 203: World Religions
Instructor: Tito Correa
Semester: Fall 2012, Fall 2014, Spring 2016, Spring 2017

A general survey of the beliefs and practices of major world religions, with a focus on Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, and new religious traditions.

RELS 250: East and West in Religion
Instructor: Dr. Burt Thorp
Semester: Fall 2013

A critical and comparative study of people’s religious orientation between Eastern and Western traditions.

SPK 208: Public Speaking – 3 credits
Instructor: Dr. Elizabeth Munz

The theory and practice of public speaking with emphasis on content, organization, language, delivery, and critical evaluation messages. Basic principles of speech from the viewpoint of composition and delivery. Emphasis on student performance stressing original thinking, effective organization and direct communication of ideas in English. You will improve your communication skills by presenting information expressing ideas and constructing arguments for particular purposes and audiences. You will also use critical thinking skills of analysis, syntheses and evaluation to create effective oral presentations where you will present research, cite sources and format outlines.

THEA 110: Introduction to Theatre 
Instructor: Emily Cherry

A survey of theatre, its history, the genres, how it is created and opportunities to view live theatre.

THEA 210: Acting for the Non-Actor 
Instructor: Emily Cherry

A study of the Meisner acting technique which utilizes, observation, listening, responding and connection with a partner.  These techniques will be coupled with connections to the business world and help students develop the “soft skills” employers are looking for.

WOS 329 Medieval Women’s Culture
Instructor: Dr. Jane Jeffrey
Semester: Spring 2014

This interdisciplinary course studies aspects of Western Medieval culture from the perspective of medieval texts written to, about, or by women during the period that spans the third through the fifteenth centuries. This writing represents numerous European languages such as Latin, Germanic, French, and English and different academic disciplines such as history, literature, and Class lectures and discussions will examine the cultural traditions prior to and contemporary with medieval women; how writings about women helped to define categories of gender, social, and religious roles; how these cultural categories marked status, privilege, and desires thought appropriate for women; and how women writers were able to adapt to or oppose the prevailing cultural conventions, write about their experiences, and, as a result, give us new perspectives for understanding women’s lives and history.